Gluten Free Christmas Cake Recipe | Juvela (2024)

', templateValue: "{{pagetitle}}", emptyTemplate: 'No result for "{{query}}"', callback: { onSubmit: function (node, form, item, event) { if (item===null){ } } } }); });

  • Contact us
  • Healthcare Professionals
  • Useful Resources
  • Trustpilot

Go back

You never need to miss out with our gluten free Christmas cake. A traditional festive fruit cake - make it up to six weeks in advance to allow plenty of time to feed it with your favourite tipple to keep it moist and full of flavour!

  • Cook: 3 hrs 0 mins
    Prep: 20 mins

  • 8 portions
  • Easy
  • Suitable for home freezing
Go back

You never need to miss out with our gluten free Christmas cake. A traditional festive fruit cake - make it up to six weeks in advance to allow plenty of time to feed it with your favourite tipple to keep it moist and full of flavour!

  • Cook: 3 hrs 0 mins
    Prep: 20 mins

  • 8 portions
  • Easy
  • Suitable for home freezing

Ingredients

1kg mixed dried fruit
200g margarine or butter
200g dark brown sugar
1 lemon, grated rind
1 orange, grated rind
4 medium eggs, beaten
250g Juvela Gluten Free White Mix
50g ground almonds
½tsp mixed spice
¼tsp nutmeg
75g glace cherries, chopped
50g carrots, peeled and grated

Method

  1. You will need to boil the fruit before use. A common problem with gluten-free fruit cakes is that the fruit can sink to the bottom, as there is no gluten present to hold the fruit in place. Boiling the fruit plumps it up and prevents it sinking – so add the fruit to a pan of boiling water, bring it back to the boil, allow to bubble for a minute and then remove from the heat and drain; you will then need to dry it thoroughly (just pop it on some kitchen roll and leave to dry; this will ensure that you don’t end up with a soggy cake!
  2. Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  3. Add the grated rind, eggs, Gluten-Free Mix, ground almonds and spices, and mix together well.
  4. Stir in the dried fruit, cherries and carrot.
  5. Grease and line a 20cm (8inch) square tin or 22.5cm (9inch) round tin. Place the mixture in the prepared tin, leaving a slight hollow in the centre.
  6. Wrap a double piece of foil around the outside of the tin and bake in a pre heated oven (150ºC/130°C Fan/300ºF/Gas Mark 2) for approximately 3 hours. (A fine skewer, when inserted in the cake, should come out completely clean when cooked).
  7. When completely cooled, wrap the cake well and store in an airtight container, and feed with brandy or tipple of your choice! The cake will keep for 6-8weeks.

Ingredients

1kg mixed dried fruit
200g margarine or butter
200g dark brown sugar
1 lemon, grated rind
1 orange, grated rind
4 medium eggs, beaten
250g Juvela Gluten Free White Mix
50g ground almonds
½tsp mixed spice
¼tsp nutmeg
75g glace cherries, chopped
50g carrots, peeled and grated

Method

  1. You will need to boil the fruit before use. A common problem with gluten-free fruit cakes is that the fruit can sink to the bottom, as there is no gluten present to hold the fruit in place. Boiling the fruit plumps it up and prevents it sinking – so add the fruit to a pan of boiling water, bring it back to the boil, allow to bubble for a minute and then remove from the heat and drain; you will then need to dry it thoroughly (just pop it on some kitchen roll and leave to dry; this will ensure that you don’t end up with a soggy cake!
  2. Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  3. Add the grated rind, eggs, Gluten-Free Mix, ground almonds and spices, and mix together well.
  4. Stir in the dried fruit, cherries and carrot.
  5. Grease and line a 20cm (8inch) square tin or 22.5cm (9inch) round tin. Place the mixture in the prepared tin, leaving a slight hollow in the centre.
  6. Wrap a double piece of foil around the outside of the tin and bake in a pre heated oven (150ºC/130°C Fan/300ºF/Gas Mark 2) for approximately 3 hours. (A fine skewer, when inserted in the cake, should come out completely clean when cooked).
  7. When completely cooled, wrap the cake well and store in an airtight container, and feed with brandy or tipple of your choice! The cake will keep for 6-8weeks.

Reviews (3)

Colly

5/5

I have been making this cake for years. It has always been perfect and I'm not a good cook.

18th Dec 2022

Diane Mawdsley

5/5

This is a great recipe for our christmas cake. Tradition now

31st Oct 2022

Leave a review

Help with gluten free
prescriptions

Unsure if you’re eligible or want to find out more about setting up a gluten free prescription?

Read more

Shop online

Fill a box with our award-winning gluten free foods and we’ll deliver it to your door.

Shop now

Gluten Free Christmas Cake Recipe | Juvela (1)

Similar recipes

Easter Cupcakes 20 mins 6 portions Easy
Easter chick Biscuits 10 mins 12 biscuits Easy
Triple Chocolate Easter Brownies 25 mins 9 Easy
Festive Flatbreads 10 mins 2 Easy
Christmas Tree Cakes 15 mins 8 Easy
Cauliflower Cheese 45 mins 4 portions Easy
Chocolate Orange Star Cookies 15 mins 12-18 Easy

We’d love you to keep in touch - sign up for our emails to keep up to date with delicious recipes and product news.

Sign up now

Gluten Free Christmas Cake Recipe | Juvela (2024)

FAQs

How do you keep gluten-free cakes moist? ›

Tips for best results
  1. Add some almond flour: Using a small amount of almond flour in your baking can enhance the taste and texture dramatically. ...
  2. Add more fat or liquid: It might just be that you need a bit more moisture in your recipe, especially if you're converting a regular “gluten-ful” recipe to gluten-free.
Jan 8, 2022

Why do gluten-free cakes not rise? ›

Gluten-free flour blends don't have the same elasticity as flour containing gluten so often the cakes don't rise as much or will sink after rising. To combat the flat cake problem, I add ½ tsp of bicarbonate of soda to the recipe even when using a self-raising gluten-free flour blend.

Why did my gluten-free cake turn out gummy? ›

Gluten-free baked goods often benefit from extra liquid to hydrate the flour blends, eliminate grittiness, and achieve a less dense or dry texture. However, it's very important to drive off this extra moisture during baking, or you'll wind up with a gummy texture.

Why are my gluten-free cakes so dry? ›

If you're finding your gluten-free cake is coming out dry, try using oil instead of vegan butter as your main fat source, this can add extra moisture. Adding a thick vegan coconut yogurt or whipped aquafaba is also another option. b. This can be caused by over baking or your oven is too hot.

What is the secret to moist gluten-free baking? ›

Moisture. There are many ways to increase moisture in a recipe. In general, recipes that call for pureed fruit, sour cream or yogurt are ones you can rely on for a moist product. In case your recipe does not call for these things, using brown sugar instead of white sugar to add moisture.

What is the trick to gluten-free baking? ›

Gluten-free flours often contain fine starches, so they absorb more liquid than conventional flour. To address this, gluten-free recipes usually call for more liquid and produce looser batters. They may also call for a larger quantity of leavening, like baking powder, to help add volume and lighten the texture.

What gluten-free flour is best for cakes? ›

What's the best gluten-free flour for baking? Bob's Red Mill gluten-free 1-to-1 baking mix is my favorite gluten-free all-purpose flour blend for baking. It has a mild texture and plenty of "stick" thanks to a blend of sweet rice flour, brown rice flour, and sorghum flour, plus some starches and xanthan gum.

Do gluten-free cakes need more liquid? ›

Add extra liquid: Gluten-free flours tend to absorb more liquid than regular flour, so you may need to add more liquid to your recipes to compensate. This can help to keep your baked goods moist and prevent them from becoming dry and crumbly.

Do gluten-free cakes need to bake longer? ›

Gluten-free goods tend to brown faster and take longer to cook through. So they need to be baked at a slightly lower temperature, for a slightly longer time. Every recipe is different, but in general, try lowering the temperature by 25 degrees and baking the item for 15 minutes longer.

Should I let my gluten free cake batter rest before baking? ›

Let Your Batters & Doughs Rest

We recommend covering your batters and doughs and letting them rest for at least half an hour. Note: This will also help batters become thicker and doughs to firm up.

Can you over mix gluten free cake batter? ›

However, you can actually mix a batter containing xanthan and/or guar gum to a point of diminishing returns. You can overwork the gums and end up with a stringy cake batter or rubbery cookie dough. (Having said that, doing this takes some work. Just don't take your aggressions out on a gluten-free cake batter.)

How do you know when a gluten-free cake is done? ›

Ultimately, the toothpick test is just one data source to rely upon: with the trio—toothpick, edges, & centre—you can reliably know your gluten-free baked goods are, well, baked! If your toothpick comes out with wet batter on it, your cake definitely needs more time.

How do you make gluten-free cake less crumbly? ›

Adding xanthan gum, to some extent, replaces the elastic qualities that gluten-free flours lack. This helps to reduce the risk of your cake crumbling and falling apart.

Why does my gluten-free cake sink in the middle? ›

It's very common for gluten free baked goods to sink in the middle and sometimes it's even gummy or looks like it isn't fully cooked. Here's some ways to help avoid that: -Don't over-mix your dough. Mix it until everything is just incorporated and be done.

Why do my gluten-free cakes taste grainy? ›

Avoid using white rice flour when baking. This was one of the first GF flours and I've found the flour to always end up with a grainy texture. Same can be true of tapioca, so I use that flour sparingly. Use three or four different GF flours for baked goods, instead of one.

Why are gluten-free baked goods so dry? ›

Some gluten free flours will produce a cake which is on the dry side. This might be due to the lack of gluten but can be for many other reasons. Lots of gluten free flour is rice based and this can result in a dry and slightly gritty texture.

How do you keep gluten-free cake from falling apart? ›

Xanthan gum (along with other thickeners like guar gum and arrowroot) acts like a binder in gluten-free baked goods to maintain their structure. Without it, there's a good chance that your brownies or muffin will crumble and fall apart.

Why is my gluten-free cake wet? ›

Timing is Key

This is because gluten-free treats often look underdone and slightly wet inside after baking. The starches only set and firm up after cooling, so at first glance, you may think more time is needed in the oven.

How do professional bakers keep cakes moist? ›

Many professional bakers turn to simple syrup to help keep cakes moist until they are assembled and iced. To make your simple syrup, combine equal parts water and granulated sugar and heat on the stove, stirring until the sugar dissolves.

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Aron Pacocha

Last Updated:

Views: 6208

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (48 voted)

Reviews: 95% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Aron Pacocha

Birthday: 1999-08-12

Address: 3808 Moen Corner, Gorczanyport, FL 67364-2074

Phone: +393457723392

Job: Retail Consultant

Hobby: Jewelry making, Cooking, Gaming, Reading, Juggling, Cabaret, Origami

Introduction: My name is Aron Pacocha, I am a happy, tasty, innocent, proud, talented, courageous, magnificent person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.